Category Archives: Riders

Friday’s Five – Eventer biographies to give you some extra determination

  There is nothing like immersing yourself in a good book. If you are a horse crazy eventer you will absolutely LOVE reading these top eventers’ biographies. The majority of riders will never win an Olympic medal or even be long listed for an Olympic team but simply reading about accomplishing such great feats is enough to leave you feeling inspired. Get your hands on a copy of these eventer biographies; reading them will teach you a tremendous deal about the sport and motivate you to make the most out of your riding career.   1) Mark Todd’s Second Chance:…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

“They thought I was mad” – Five-star eventer, Phoebe Buckley

  They say that every good horse has a good story, and the same is surely true of riders also. Phoebe Buckley is a veteran of many 5* events, and her career achievements make for impressive reading. An excellent trainer of both horses and riders, Phoebe has a unique ability to instill belief in those who lack it, and to turn the improbable into the achievable. Phoebe lives in Cambridge, in the United Kingdom. She is a Romany gypsy. Phoebe’s parents Susan and Tom settled when their daughter was four years old in order to provide stability, and to allow…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Important and not-so-obvious things you better have in your horse trailer

  If you own a horse (or several… who’s counting?) and a horse trailer you probably travel a fair amount with your horse in tow. Whether you are just hauling your horse 10 minutes down the road to a lesson or you are heading out of state to a big horse show, any trip with your horse is a big responsibility. The combination of horses and traffic means you always need to expect the unexpected. Therefore, you should never leave the barn without these must-haves in your horse trailer: Things to change a tire You never know when you are…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Simple but game-changing grooming tip: Save a filthy tail minutes before show time

  Your average equestrian spends more time grooming horses than riding them. Over the years we all learn new, exciting and revolutionary grooming tips and tactics. Check back regularly for more grooming tips as we are on the hunt for the best.  Pooping in their own tails is some horses’ special ability. On a show morning, this grooming nightmare is enough to make you want to toss your cookies and skip the competition altogether rather than deal with it. Obviously hosing it out is the best solution but if you trailer to a show and have a limited amount of…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Friday’s Five – Side hustles any equestrian can start to earn extra money

  You do not have to be a full-time professional rider, groom, farrier, etc. to make money in the horse industry. Many riders find part-time summer jobs to help pay for their horse expenses. Skip waiting tables this summer and start up a mini-business instead. You will rake in some extra cash, while still spending all of your time around horses. These business ideas will help you earn more money so you can spend more on your horses: 5) Braiding at events – Instead of heading back to your hotel after you finish braiding your own horse, braid other people’s…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Four lifesaving tips to stay better organized at one-day events

  It is easy to have a love/hate relationship with one-day events. It’s great that you are in and out of the venue in a single day and free to spend the rest of your weekend how you please. But it can be a nightmare running three different phases in a single day. If you want your one-day events to go smoothly then you need to be super organized. From the moment you pull into the event, you have to have all of your ducks (horses) in a row. Getting and staying organized is not rocket science, but it does…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Quirks or vices? Horse behaviour at its most interesting

  Meet Lynn: Besides running my dog grooming business of 35+ years, I’m a 59 year old (EEEK did I say my age out loud! )horse nut and an Adult Amateur Eventer extraordinaire in Area 1 living my equine dream with an amazing horse in the wake of personal loss. Thanks to family and my horse and dog connections, I have gotten through a very hard year. The horse life with all its highs and lows has kept me on my own two feet; as I continue to strive to be the best rider I can be for my horse….

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Tuesday’s Top 10 – Irrational fears that haunt every equestrian

  WARNING: Only read if you have a sense of humour Check in every Tuesday for our Top 10 list that could feature just about anyone or anything related to Eventing. No rider, owner, coach, or nation is off limits. Remember: “Life is a tragedy for those who feel and a comedy for those who think.”   10) Showing up at a horse show only to realize you forgot your horse. 9) The wind tipping over a Port-A-Potty while you are in it. 8) Falling off of your horse and it running away into the wild. Forever. 7) Having an ‘Rated R’ wardrobe…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

How to ride and train flying changes like a boss – It’s not that complicated

  So, it is not my place to comment on four-star riders’ dressage. But after watching the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event CCI5*-L and Mitsubishi Motors Badminton Horse Trials CCI5*-L on the live stream I realized eventers are still struggling with flying changes. Sure, ultra-fit event horses get tense in that big atmosphere in the dressage ring, and a horse with a usual great change could suddenly have a meltdown. But there were a few horses that looked like they had never been schooled in their changes. Now, I am not claiming I am some flying change guru, but I…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

3 Valuable lessons equestrians can learn from galloping Thoroughbreds

  I picked up a side job galloping racehorses in the mornings, and while it isn’t easy, I would STRONGLY encourage any serious event rider to spend a month (or more) riding in the fast lane. Is it dangerous? Sure, as are most things we do with horses, particularly riding cross-country. However, finding the right trainer is key: someone who has sensible horses and who won’t overface you. Going to a farm or local training centre will be a better starting environment than the racetrack; things are a little more laid back and beginner-friendly with less on-track traffic. The trainer…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect