Author Archives: Sable Giesler

Understanding horse body language – Translation guide

Horses unfortunately cannot communicate to us using words so they use their body language to express things to us. Help understand what your horse is trying to tell you with this translation guide:   Body language: Your horse goes ballistic when you try to pull its mane and/or tail. Translation: I’m not into this type of kink…   Body language: Your horse ‘accidentally’ hits you in the face while it swishes at flies and you try to tack it up. Translation: Shoo owner, don’t ride me   Body language: Your horse steps on your foot wile you are out grazing…

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Time to complete your 2015 competition season report card

National, provincial and area championships are nearing and the 2015 summer competition season has come to an end. Did you successfully make that upgrade you were aiming to do this year? Did you qualify for championships? Have you made the amount of progress in your riding and horse’s training that you were striving for this year? Now is the time to reflect on your year so you can ensure that next year is even more successful. Hitting a plateau is frustrating – no matter how much time you spend in the saddle you just cannot make the progress you would…

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How to be a perfect Working Student – 13 step guide

  You apply for a Working Student (WS) position with the rider who you have idolized for years and you get the job. You have fantasies about exercising their top horses and travelling with them to big events to help groom… But in reality a WS mucks stalls, tacks up horses, washes horses, blankets horses, turns horses out, sets jumps, and performs various other unglamorous tasks. Nonetheless, being a WS is an opportunity that will teach you how top riders train and manage their entire operations. If you take on the job of being someone’s WS you surely want to…

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Friday’s Five – Apps riders need

Being a rider is not an easy lifestyle. But thanks to these apps you can make your horse life go much smoother. I use a minimum of one or two of these apps on a daily basis and they make my life so much simpler.   Here are five apps that every rider needs: 1. MyFitnessPal – This is the fastest and easiest-to-use calorie counting app available in the App Store. Why do riders need this? By monitoring your calorie intake and how many calories you burn through exercise, you can make wiser health choices on a daily basis. Riders are athletes so…

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Burghley top ten – Produced not bought

In North America there is a shortage of four-star horses and those that have placed in the top ten at a four-star are very minimal. Why are there so few four-star horses in North America compared to Europe? Well there are obvious reasons like lack of owners, breeders, competitions and access to top training. But could it also be that riders are not producing horses from early enough in the horses’ careers? I have delved into the statistics to see how the top ten horses at Burghley became four-star contenders and it would seem that you need to produce a…

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Friday’s Five – Winning turnout tips

Good turnout is more than riding a shiny horse down centreline wearing sparkling boots as I talked about in my last article, “Good turnout is more than shining your boots“. But looking like a winner is still part the entire package. Various talented grooms have taught me some of their trade secrets to help make their riders’ horses glisten. Here are my five favourite turnout tips that you should implement at your next competition: 1. Baby oil to shine your horse’s face. – A little bit of baby oil around your horse’s eyes and muzzle goes a long way. You can…

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Good turnout is more than shining your boots

The night before an event, most riders (or their grooms) are meticulously shining their boots, making sure their horse’s braids are picture perfect, bleaching the grey horse’s tail one more time, etc. These are all part of the beauty rituals riders put themselves and their horses through so they gleam when they trot down centerline, hopefully impressing the judge. This is what horse people call “good turnout”. Many riders pride themselves in their turnout and strive to win the best turnout award at the event (yes some events actually have judges and award a prize). Why is turnout important? Is…

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I am betting on these pairs as Burghley’s top five – Who would you bet on?

History is a good indicator of the future. So I am having some fun and seeing what role FEI past results will play in determining how the Burghley results will play out. By analyzing the FEI records of everyone competing this weekend, these are my predictions for the top five duos by the end of day Sunday. 5th – Jonelle Price and Classic Moet • Lifetime best CCI4* score: 56.5 – 4th at WEG 2014 • Most recent CCI4* outing: 62.9 – 20th Badminton 2015 • Last FEI outing: 48.2 – 2nd at Gatcombe Park CIC3* 2015 Jonelle and Classic…

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Horse grooming nightmares – I almost had to amputate my horse’s forelock

What the hell is wrong with my horse’s forelock?! – My first thought yesterday morning. I began assessing why Kermit’s forelock was in a giant clump and came to the realization that he must have been rolling around in a plant with burrs. Panic began to set in. Would I ever get this mess detangled? Or would I have to amputate – AKA roach off his entire forelock and mane (to match). Fortunately with patience and Show Sheen I was able to save his forelock. After breathing a sigh of relief I suddenly had a flashback to all of the…

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Seven tests every eventer must pass on their road to success

Eventing will challenge you on an athletic and personal level daily. If you want to be a successful eventer you are going to experience challenge and discomfort throughout your career. What separates eventers from average humans is our ability to endure agonizing situations for the sake of competing. Unfortunately, once you have successfully suffered through some of these inevitable tests, there are no guarantees that you won’t have to go through them again.   1. Falling off in the water – Eventually, you will get wet on cross-country. I was Baptized by the Eventing Gods in May [Swimming in the…

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