Author Archives: Ema Klugman

Buying a new horse? Use these six tips to assess its record before you buy

  You are looking to buy or lease a new horse. How do you consider its competition record? Before you think about going to try a horse, you should look up its record. This will save you time and travel expenses because it will give you a gauge to whether or not the horse is suited to your goals. The horse will have a published record if it has competed at recognized shows; if it has only done schooling shows you should request the results of such competitions from the owner. In the U.S., you can the find public results…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Friday’s Five – Simple steps to find the ideal bit for your horse

  The perfect bit: is it out there? Where is it hiding? No matter your level, you want to find an appropriate bit for your horse that both maximizes the quality of his performance and permits you to have enough control to train and compete safely. Follow these steps in your bit search:  1)    Know what your end goal is. An appropriate bit will encourage the horse to connect to both reins evenly. It will also provide the rider with enough influence to turn and slow down in a safe manner. If you have a particular problem that you want your bitting choice to…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

How to go horse shopping overseas – A first-timer’s take

  I’ll preface this article with a qualification: it’s more of a story about my experience than a how-to guide. I will tell the tale of my successful horse shopping trip, but as is common with horses, success is more related to timing, connections, and luck than anything else. There are lots of ways to buy a horse abroad. Here’s how I did it: A family friend in London has a daughter who competes in show jumping. Through her daughter, Sarah knows lots of the show jumping yards (English for ‘barns,’ if you’re reading this from America) and professionals who…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Thank your trainer for an awesome year with these four original ideas

  It’s nearly the holiday season, as Americans like to say, and the festivities are starting to begin. Families are getting together, friends are spending time with one another, and people are reflecting on their year. Though not everyone exchanges presents at this time of year, it can be a nice gesture to show your appreciation for your trainer if you feel inclined to. After all, your trainer probably helped you improve this year. She might have helped you move up a level, or given your horse valuable education. She probably watched you jump some great rounds, and probably sighed…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Six simple steps to master the art of jumping angled fences

  Angled fences show up on almost every upper-level cross country course around the world. Even if you are currently at the Novice level, it’s important to start introducing this concept to yourself and your horse so that you are comfortable with it in the future. A few things to remember about angling fences—you don’t have to be a rider to realize these, you just have to think mathematically. First, when you angle a fence you make it wider. If the table is three feet wide when you jump it perpendicularly, then it may be four or five feet wide,…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Three important things to remember during No-Stirrup November

  As we delve into the month of November, lots of riders are taking on the challenge to drop their stirrups for the month. Some go so far as to taking their stirrups off of their saddles altogether. Riding sans stirrups is integral to developing a good seat, correct feel, and instinct for what to do when things go wrong. I think jumping small fences without stirrups really shows you where your balance is in the air, and how you tend to lean left or right. You also never know when a tack malfunction could leave you stirrup-less on course,…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Kindness in the Eventing community – A Boyd Martin story

  It has been a tough week for Boyd Martin and his team. At a time like this, we want to remind everyone what an outstanding person Boyd is at his core. Two years ago, Boyd was incredibly generous with his time and knowledge at the Fair Hill International with one of our writers, Ema Klugman. So in the spirit of #FlashbackFriday, here is Ema’s story…   I’ve always admired great riders for their talent and drive, for their ability to make difficult tasks look simple. At Fair Hill International, I admired them not only as riders and as horsemen,…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

Get a jump start on No-stirrup November and make yourself a more solid rider

  It’s almost that time of year again! We can thank the language nerds out there for exploiting the power of alliteration to create powerful slogans. No-stirrup November can be thirty days of hell for every rider. Here are some tips to make it less painful and more effective in the long-run. In fact, riding with no-stirrups should be part of your training all year. Start gradually Ideally, we would all remember to ride without stirrups once or twice a week every week of the year. I, for one, often forget to. We get wrapped up in preparing for competitions,…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

What to expect at your first FEI event – Guide for first timers

  In an earlier article, I explained how first time eventers can ensure they are successful at their first event. In this piece, I will discuss short-format three-day events (CIC or CCI competitions). The main differences between a one-day and a three-day are: horse inspections, cross country courses, and the order of phases. 1. In-barn inspections After you arrive on the show grounds, one of the FEI vets will look over your horse and take his temperature, pulse, and respiration. You will need to bring his FEI passport to the in-barns. After being stamped, this passport will stay in the secretary’s…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect

How to ‘College’ and keep riding

  It seems our generation is one of neologisms: I’ll tweet something, you’ll Google it, she’ll take a selfie with it—you get the idea. A newly coined verb I learned last week is “college.” Yes, the noun “college” is obvious, but the new fad of the word as a verb has taken off for various comical and dysfunctional reasons. Given the fact that their intelligence got them into higher institutions, you would think that college students wouldn’t use college as a verb. Apparently they do. “How to college” represents a variety of things: how to do laundry, how to sneak…

Scroll for more top stories on Eventing Connect