Category Archives: Riders

Learning through teaching: Part 1 – Connecting concepts through viewing

As I outlined in a past article, achieving the upper level Pony Club ratings can open many doors for young people in this sport. One such type of opportunity is teaching, which I have been able to pursue for the last few years with several private students and the occasional clinic-type situation. Without this organization, I would not have had the chance to teach in Hawaii this past weekend at two local clubs on O’ahu. Many have echoed the sentiment that Phil Collins so pithily sums up: “in learning you will teach, and in teaching you will learn.” Over the…

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Expanding your boundaries and making progress

As an eventer, I love a challenge.  That’s not to say I never take a day off, or enjoy something simple.  But I thrive on the thrill of accomplishment– that feeling of success when you achieve something previously outside of your sphere of ability.  I’m driven to succeed; not necessarily the ambition to be perfect, but to be better, smarter, more confident, or stronger than I was the day before.  The same holds true for my approach with horses. Horses always have ups and downs, that’s part of the process.  But over time, you like to see a general trend…

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Friday’s Five – Ideas to thank your supporters for another great year

There are certain people in your life that have made pursuing your riding dreams much easier. All riders have people that support them in some aspect. Supporters can range from a significant other that tags along to your shows providing moral support, a sponsor, owner, parent that doubles as a groom, a dedicated coach, vet, farrier, barn owner – anyone who contributes to your riding is a supporter. Now is the time to make sure your supporters know how you appreciate them.   Here are five ideas to thank your supporters for another great year: 1. Give a framed picture…

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What you should know before your OTTB’s first ride off the track

Each year, lots of racing thoroughbreds find their way into new homes and new careers. There are two schools of thought when a horse steps off the racetrack: turn ’em out, or get on with riding Prior to my experience in the Thoroughbred industry, I was a member of the “turn ’em out” crowd. I figured it would be best for the horse to “detox” and enjoy a month or more of turnout, relaxing and just being a horse. I assumed all the horse knew was running, and I wanted to put some distance (time) between that association before I…

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Keeping the dream alive by earning outside the stables – Kyle Carter shares new business venture

Canadian Kyle Carter is best known as one of North America’s top riders. He rode for his country at the 2010 Kentucky World Equestrian Games silver medal-winning team, the 2008 Beijing Olympics team, the 2007 Rio de Janeiro Pan American Games team, the 1999 Winnipeg Pan American Games and he placed 2nd at the 1999 Rolex Kentucky Three Day Event. Aside from his personal accolades he is also enormously successful at helping other riders. His coaching business has produced numerous riders to the four-star level and he holds the coaching record for the most gold medal finishes at North American Junior and…

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William is now home and continuing his recovery there

William is at home and will continue his rehabilitation there as reported on his website this morning. William has made good progress with his recovery and has now been discharged from hospital to continue his rehab at home. “It is fantastic to be back home, it feels like it has been a long time away from my family,” said William, “I would like to thank all the doctors in France from the team at Le Lion D’Angers to those who looked after me in the ICU in Angers. The rehab team in Poole General Hospital have been incredibly thorough. “The…

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How to stay sane on stall rest

“Stall rest.” Two of the most dreaded words any eventer can hear, or any horse person for that matter. I’ve been dealing with this myself most of the year when my mare Classy’s odd hind end lameness was finally diagnosed as a suspensory injury at the end of the spring. A month of stall rest, followed by another month of stall rest with hand-walking, then building up from there provided everything goes to plan (spoiler alert, it didn’t but we’re getting there). So what do you do when you’re a rider that can’t ride? There’s a few things you can…

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A WHOLE NEW BREED OF CRAZY, BROKEN BONES AND BRAVE OR STUPID?

Eventers are a hardy bunch, no one can deny that. Rivaled only by jump jockeys, we positively pride ourselves on our ability to keep going regardless. We face a million challenges every day – from paying bills to keeping the whole show on the road but nowhere do we excel as well as we do with injuries. No matter if you have an arterial bleed – “sure just stick a band aid on it and it’ll be fine”. Compound fractures are no biggie – “well it probably shouldn’t look like that, but get some vet wrap and an animalintex from…

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My school master delivers my first home bred horse – Way more drama than I ever imagined

Pamela entered my life in the fall of 2009. I needed a schoolmaster as I was ready to event at the training level but my horse was not. My gelding, Rambo (aka Evil Munchkin) at that time was successfully living up to his name and was not something that a 14 year old wanted to pilot around her first few trainings and prelims. When our friend Nicole Stewart Harding knew I was looking for a veteran horse, she suggested that I try her mare Pamela. Pamela had previously competed at advanced in her prime. However, Nicole had switched disciplines and…

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When the going gets tough, keep riding through it

Let’s face it: horses will be horses.  We can have wonderful rides at home: relaxed, rhythmic, forward, and obedient…but sometimes when we step foot in public, that’s not what happens.  It can be frustrating, for sure– we know we have a wonderful horse and we want everyone else to see him that way.  Sometimes horses sense this pressure we have to do well in front of a crowd, and things go from bad to worse. What is there to do?  Ride through it.  Embrace the notion that your horse isn’t perfect, that riding isn’t perfect, that life isn’t perfect.  Do…

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